W. B. (Bill) Plaunt

July 11, 2011

Louis Espagnol, the Native manager of the Hudson’s Bay Post and chief of one of the Spanish River bands was the predominant individual in the mid-19th century at Pogamasing. The honour of this distinction for the early 20th century would go to Bill Plaunt. The two men came from two vastly different worlds, one being […]

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The CPR and Pogamasing: from Steam Engines to the Budd Car

July 8, 2011

Going to Pog and going by train have been synonymous for me as long as long as I can remember. The building of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1884 created the possibility for a place like Pog. For my family, the opportunity came in 1929 when my grandfather found a mill site at Wye, the […]

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Canoeing into the Past

May 13, 2011

Anyone familiar with the geography of the Pogamasing knows the area is a wonderland of waterways for canoeists. It was the Anishnabe who first opened up the area by making nastawgans, their winter and summer travel routes. As the Anishnabe returned to their winter hunting grounds in the fall up the Spanish River they would […]

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Wye, From Lumber Village to Ghost Town

March 28, 2011

Anyone travelling west on the Budd Car out of Sudbury follows the historic route of the first transcontinental line that was built across Canada in the 1880’s. Dotted along the line are many stops, small villages and towns that were created to service the railway: most were sidings for passing on the single tracked rail […]

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Old Maps: From the North Shore to Lake Pogamasing

March 1, 2011

Have you ever read a history book or a travelogue about an area and the author didn’t provide a map? I have, and it’s very frustrating. So you can be sure there will be lots of maps in my book about Pogamasing. I was also fortunate to locate maps beyond the Pogamasing region and I […]

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Why Some Ducks Don’t Fly into Pog

February 28, 2011

Pog has seen a curious variety of airplanes which have dropped into the lake, from a Curtiss Lark in 1926, to a Grumman Goose in 1948. Over the years, however, the most common of all has been the de Havilland Beaver. But there is one metalic creatures that can’t get off the ground, nor was it […]

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Old Growth Pines in the Pogamasing Forest

February 23, 2011

Protection of existing old growth pines is a major concern for many who want to preserve the last of our great forests. Recent protests against logging these forests have been somewhat successful at stopping further reductions of old growth pine. However, cutting is not the only threat. Forest fires were quite common prior to 1900 […]

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The Importance of Lake Trout to Pogamasing

February 18, 2011

As youngsters growing up at Lake Pogamasing, we were fascinated by the lake trout our parents brought home. Whenever we heard the boats arriving, the cries of “first fish, second fish”, could be heard as we ran to the dock, hoping for the thrill of carrying the fish up the path to show everyone. In […]

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The Surveyor: The Unsung Hero of the North

February 1, 2011

Have you ever thought of how the survey lines on your property were determined? I’ve got to admit that I had never thought of it until I came across some reports and maps of the first surveyors in the Pogamasing area. Then I understood the connection between property lines and those that were marked over […]

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